Hambone Willie: The West Tennessee Connection to the American Song


Here we have an interesting point in American music history:

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Hambone Willie Newbern and his version of Roll and Tumble Blues

I have been doing some reading on West TN Blues and have known this but am just know realizing how seminal many artists from West TN were on the blues at large. Exhibit number one: Roll and Tumble Blues. Though not the first to record this tune (Gus Cannon Jug Stompers whose Noah Lewis was from Henning, TN) his arrangement was used by Robert Johnson for his “Possession Over Judgement Day” and Muddy Waters’ version by a similar title. So here is where I am right now. Are the Delta Blues really just West TN Blues morphed into something else due to the artist’s own take on the originals?

Obviously there were songs floating about all over America’s South, specifically along the areas on the East and West of the Mississippi River. What I find particularly interesting is the attention paid to the more “noted” performers (Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, etc.) and the assumption that they were the seminal influence on the music’s coming of age. When in reality they were an early link in the chain with other links preceding them, if not simply in a historical context. Of course the tunes played by Hambone Willie Newbern and Gus Cannon’s Jug Stompers had to have come from somewhere also. Yet is it possible that West Tennesse can lay as much a claim to being grandfather’s of “the Blues” as anyone else?

 

More about Hambone Willie Newbern Below.

Little is known about blues songster Hambone Willie Newbern; a mere half-dozen sides comprise the sum of his recorded legacy, but among those six is the first-ever rendition of the immortal Delta classic “Roll and Tumble Blues.” Reportedly born in 1899, he first began to make a name for himself in the Brownsville, TN area, where he played country dances and fish fries in the company of Yank Rachell; later, on the Mississippi medicine show circuit, he mentored Sleepy John Estes (from whom most of the known information about Newbern originated). While in Atlanta in 1929, Newbern cut his lone session; in addition to “Roll and Tumble,” which became an oft-covered standard, he recorded songs like “She Could Toodle-Oo” and “Hambone Willie’s Dreamy-Eyed Woman’s Blues,” which suggest an old-fashioned rag influence. By all reports an extremely ill-tempered man, Newbern’s behavior eventually led him to prison, where a brutal beating is said to have brought his life to an end around 1947. ~ Jason Ankeny, Rovi

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/hambone-willie-newbern#ixzz25ywWe8dQ

 

Taste Makers and the Soul of Rock N Roll: Parsing the Ether


Taste Makers and the Soul of Rock N Roll: Parsing the Ether

Does Rock n Roll exist anymore? Probably not in the way it was once conceptualized by the masses. Here is why. From my previous post
I expounded liberally on the useless distinction for Indie Rock and really most of the sub genres now I will school you on what has happened, like you don’t already know, which I am sure you do.
We have to go all the way back to 1950 something. Elvis, Carl Perkins, and Johnny Cash were recording rockabilly history at Sun studio in Memphis, Ray Charles was making awesomeness at Atlantic in New York, and Muddy Waters and Howling Wolf were blazing blues standards at Chess in Chicago. Tons of others were also doing the same in their own way. They were feeding the information pipeline of the day: the record store and the radio and then television to some extent and the trade print that their art received. That was just about the whole shooting match. But guaranteed elsewhere there were people all over the place making music in bars, restaurants, garages, basements, street corners, swap meets, basements, and solitary rooms which will never be heard again. Was most of it passable? This depends on the context of the listener and its maker. If the goal was to bring joy and joy was brought then most assuredly it passed muster. Was it worthy of archiving? Most likely it was not. Sure Jimmy Dale sitting in his bedroom off of Union Ave. in Memphis, a few blocks from Sun, probably thought he did a mean Blue Moon of Kentucky but it was probably not worth the tape it would have taken to record it. (Jimmy Dale is a totally made up character but I would bet good money that someone similar, or hundreds of someone similar, abounded.)This leads to the next point.
Fast forward or skip scenes to now. The Jimmy Dale of 2012 has not only the ability to record his Blue Moon of Kentucky, but on better equipment than Sam Phillips ever thought about or dreamt. Sir George Martin would have killed to have recorded the Beatles on this type of technology which can be had for a few hundred bucks. Not only that but the Jimmy Dale can pump his Blue Moon of Kentucky out to the entire planet, forget the local Poplar Tunes record store or Wal-Mart but the ENTIRE PLANET! Someone in Bahrain can get online and hear him, seconds after he hits the enter button on his keyboard. What does this give us? A world cluttered with music which, most of the time, no one really wants to hear. Why? Because it is unoriginal, or not well performed, or boring, or stale, or all the above and just hard to listen to and no one has the ability to start cutting through layer after layer or shovel dirt pan after dirt pan to reach the gems. Why? There is too much digging involved. We don’t have all day to dig and after a bit of it you just become frustrated and go back to listening to the things you used to or the bands new tracks that you already know about and hope at some point something will cross your fancy.
We have entered a conundrum which is so meaty. When the audience first got all access, via Napster and other P2P, they really did not search out new bands as much as steal from the ones they already loved or knew about. The new ones they checked out they were learning about from the traditional routes they always had. At the same time digital recording was really coming into its own and more and more people were flooding the internet with music and anyone that studied on it long enough could figure out how to get their music on all the .mp3 sites. All of sudden there was bombastic overload and the lingering question of “what to do about it?”
This only became a preponderating situation once people could stream music and basically flood the entire internet with their own masterpieces. Music is literally everywhere out there. Good, bad, mediocre, middling, and some absolutely fantastic. But where does that leave the normal passive listener?
People on one hand were clamoring “we want our freedom to listen to all the music we can and don’t you try to stop us” and others “hey I do not know what to listen to because there is too much to listen to.” This is where the record company suits should be provided a time machine, be allowed to go back, exit the time machine, find themselves and kick themselves for being so stupid and not jumping on this in some way, because they really did nothing proactive, on a large-scale, that I can see. Because whether the average Joe wants to admit it or not he wants people to tell him what to like, at least the generations brought up on bland radio and record stores. The record companies did provide a filter they were the last one. After an artist had made it through some touring, put out some things, worked through all the agents, club owners, and manager types and still had enough left in the proverbial bank to cut it the label would release something and most of the time it was passable if not downright great. They took chances on people who need chances taken on them and many of our musical tastes are much better for it. They are no longer serving in that capacity because the big timers are after the big buck and the smaller labels who used to take more chances cannot afford it or are not even in existence any longer.
Enter the taste maker. A taste maker is similar to a music critic but then again they serve the role, in a way, record companies used to serve. Apparently when these cats heard or read the quote “everyone’s a critic” they took it to heart and did something about it. They are parsing the ether to pull out the gems for you. Many people like this because, frankly, they like to be told what is cool because they want to seem cool themselves, they do not have time, they want to out hip their friends, or they simply trust the guidance of the taste maker and go with it because they just want to hear some rocking music prêt-à-porter.
A caveat to all my friends who are critics: you are still critics and I am not belittling your trade in the slightest, especially if you have been a critic of music for over 10 years. Critics have always been taste makers. But due to the large volume of music out there people are screaming to give them guidance and there is really a demand because supply side is through the roof. They want the freedom of mass content but do not have the ability, time, or patience to do the parsing themselves. Kind of like a kid given free rein at a toy store for 30 minutes, where to start?
The taste maker websites will continue to thrive and people will latch on to them, no matter how cool they think they are, because they are incapable of choosing their own music, even the hipsters who were not smart enough to start their own taste making website. The ones that did have to turn in your hipster badge because you are part of the machine! (I Kidding)

These are strange and intense times. It almost seems the very soul of Rock N Roll and music for that matter depends on this. It was just that no one knew it was so big.